Who Was Henry Freeman?

Born in Bridlington, Henry Freeman moved to Whitby at the top of Bakehouse Yard, which now has a blue plaque to commemorate one of Whitby’s proudest sons. At first Henry took on his father’s trade as a brick layer but eventually fell in love with sea in around 1858. He worked throughout Newcastle, London, and…

The Landlady of the White Horse and Griffin

The White Horse and Griffin was originally constructed in 1691, the history in the building has made for various ghosts that have been witnessed by guests and staff at the inn. One of the lost souls are that of a previous landlady called Mrs Bowler, the dates of her death are unknown but the famous…

Maggie of Whitby

Often referred to as ‘Mad Maggie‘ Maggie had a reputation around Whitby which left her feared by anyone who crossed her path. She lived alongside the Church Steps and children would often flee if they saw her outside her home. Even those who didn’t believe she was a witch would spend their days searching for witch…

The Screaming Tunnel

As you walk along the West Cliff and make your way towards the Khyber Pass you will come across a small tunnel that you will have seen many times that perfectly frame the Whitby Abbey from where it stands. Although it is beautiful and picturesque it is best avoided at night. Many holiday makers and…

The Seaman’s Hospital

With Whitby being a famous seasside town it’s no surprise that at one point we even had our own hospital specifically for seamen. The hospital didn’t just act as a place that sailors and fisherman would be treated and cared for by doctors but it was also a safe haven for the widows of seamen…

Little Kate and the Bouncing Ball

A couple of hundred of years ago, when Runswick Bay was a busy fishing town, a carpenter named ‘Crook Back Tom’ was the main figure in this folklore. According to legend Crook Back Tom got his namesake from being pushed into carpentry at an age as early as 3, being his father’s apprentice. To deal…

Humpty Dumpty’s Grave

Whitby is full of rich literary history, from being the the holiday destination of Charles Dickens, and Lewis Carroll, to inspiring the classic novel Count Dracula. But little do people know that even a famous nursery rhyme has made its way into Whitby’s history. Within St Mary’s Church is said to be the grave of…